Keep Your Courage Up and Believe God

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The 276 people aboard the ship bound for Rome bobbed about in the sea at the mercy of the fierce Euroquilo (northeaster) storm that battered the ship’s sails and rigging to the point that the captain ordered them taken down, leaving the ship subject to the storm’s capricious will. The fierce squall raged for days unabated in its fury, bringing with it misery upon misery for the passengers and crew. Acts 27:20 says, “Since neither sun nor stars appeared for many days, and no small storm was assailing us, from then on all hope of our being saved was gradually abandoned.” Between verses 20 and 21 of Acts 27 it appears a few more days pass for the narrative states, “And when they had gone a long time without food, then Paul stood up in their midst” encouraging them that no one would perish from the storm, though the ship would be lost.

In verse 23 Paul tells the passengers and crew that an angel of God appeared to him that very night telling him, “Do not be afraid, Paul; you must stand before Caesar; and behold, God has granted you all those who are sailing with you. Therefore, keep up your courage, men, for I believe God that it will turn out exactly as I have been told (verses 24-25).”

Oh, wouldn’t it be just lovely when we are experiencing our own northeaster storms and our hearts are tempted to despair that all hope is lost, we could, like Paul, have a direct messenger from God, telling us not to be afraid? Such a message would be so particular and tailored for us that we immediately take heart. Yes, it might be tempting to somewhat envy Paul’s personal encouragement from the Lord. Yet, there really is no need for envy on our part, for we have received just such a kindness from the Lord, in fact, even better, for the multiplied promises of deliverance contained in the Scriptures cover every circumstance we might ever undergo.   

Paul encouraged all on board the ship to keep up their courage because, as he said, “I believe God (Acts 27:25).” Knowing that God always keeps His Word, Paul chose to believe God’s promise of deliverance would come to pass. Paul trusted in God’s character of faithfulness to fulfill His promises and render aid to His children. Paul’s words of faith and trust—I believe God—can encourage us today when we face our own storms.

Will you keep up your courage and believe God?

God says He is always with us. The author of Hebrews reminds us that Jesus Himself said, “I will never desert you, nor will I ever forsake you so that we confidently say, ‘The Lord is my helper, I will not be afraid. What will man do to me?’ (Hebrews 13:5-6).” That universal promise of the Lord’s presence is meant to bolster our courage and lead us out of fear, so that we can respond with that same faith and hope as Paul—“The Lord is my helper, I will not be afraid!”

God says He is the God who delivers. Psalm 107 is a testimony to the delivering nature of God. He comes to the rescue of His children—always, as the oft repeated phrase attests, “Then they cried out to the Lord in their trouble, and He delivered them out of their distresses (Psalm 107:6, 13, 19, 28).”

God says He is an active and ever present helper to us. Psalm 46:1-2 proclaims, “God is our refuge and strength, a very present help in trouble. Therefore we will not fear, though the earth should change and though the mountains slip into the heart of the sea.”

God says He brings us through the trials. Psalm 68:19-20 encourages us, “Blessed be the Lord, who daily bears our burden, the God who is our salvation. God is to us a God of deliverances; and to God the Lord belong escapes from death.”

If we continue to look at Paul’s story in Acts 27, we also learn that though Paul received God’s comforting message that all would be saved from the storm, it’s also helpful to note that deliverance wasn’t immediate. There were still more hours of soul-numbing and body-bruising buffeting from the storm before God’s rescue would be realized. In fact, the text says they endured the storm a total of 14 days, going that long without food as well. It wasn’t until Paul again encouraged them all to trust God, and cheerfully led the way in eating some food, that they themselves finally took heart and partook of some nourishment (verse 36).

Trusting God means keeping your courage up. Keeping our courage up comes from focusing on the Lord's character and His complete faithfulness. Trusting who He is, helps us wait well for our deliverance. David understood this when he wrote in Psalm 27:13-14, "I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord In the land of the living. Wait for the Lord; Be strong and let your heart take courage; Yes, wait for the Lord."

We learn from Paul’s example, and other writers of Scripture, that we can trust God, believing His promises, even when the pledged help and aid isn’t given immediately. Can’t you hear Paul? “God said He would preserve us from the storm, so He will. We can believe God, even though right now, the storm continues to rage. He will bring us through, so let us trust Him! Our God is faithful!”

Without a doubt, it is difficult to keep trusting the Lord when there are no changes in our circumstances or when the situation even worsens. Yet even then the promises of God are true, no matter what our situation. We often have an idea of what our deliverance should look like, but God rarely rescues us in the way we expect. He will, however, deliver us in His way, in His time, and in the way that will produce the most spiritual profit in us and promote praise in our hearts.

Therefore, keep your courage up, for I believe God.